“A PLEASANT QUIT” & WHEN SHOULD I QUIT MY JOB?

When should i quit my job

After reading the previous blog “8 SIGNS YOU’VE BEEN IN YOUR JOB TOO LONG“, you realized that you are wondering about staying or needing a new job to grow. A lot of questions run around in your head, one of them is:
“WHEN SHOULD I QUIT MY JOB AND HOW TO MAKE A PLEASANT QUIT?”

PART 1

1. DOES ” A PLEASANT QUIT ” EXIST?

The thing that you call “A Pleasant Quit” does not exist in reality.
“A Pleasant Quit” means “When you quit your job, everyone will regret losing a colleague like you”.

Why does it not exist? Because when you quit your job, there is never happen “Everyone feels regretful!”
No matter how you good at work (even if you are the best person in your company). no matter how you good at your relationship with everyone in the company (even you are a person most favorite company).

When you quit, this is what will happen:
– Some people will regret it.
– Some people will feel normal.
– And some people will feel happy.

You understand, right?

It does not depend on who you are, how you are, or which position you are holding. Even if you are a company owner. When you are a very good person, there will be people who do not like that good (for example people are often taken out to compare with you!). Even when you are the most loved person, there will be second favorite people happy when you leave, because now they are ranked first!

So, “A Pleasant Quit” is something that never exists.

2. WHAT WILL HAPPEN WHEN YOU QUIT?

Let me tell you the truth: The fact that “not leaving a bad rumor about me” when quitting, does not really exist…

I remember the day when I left “a quite big position” in a multinational company. Because I felt that I did not want to and could not contribute more, while the salary and benefits were good. Many people were surprised, they do not even believe in “retiring from work because of not feeling contribution”.
For them, just needing adequate wages and benefits. The less work, the more happiness. So they think it is not the reason for my leaving.

From here starts a rumor “He quit because of some discontent with the leaders”. More worrisome, many people began to make a theory, that I quit because of my Boss. “His boss stomped on the spot, so he could not continue to promote, therefore he was dissatisfied”
Even if I am a person who does not care much about the so-called position, that rumor may still exist, even now

So, the definition of “A Pleasant Quit” means not leaving a bad rumor about you, which also does not exist.

3. WHAT IS REALLY “A PLEASANT QUIT”?

“A Pleasant Quit”. For me, it is leaving your job without having any worries.
For employees to not worry about leaving, there are two things you must definitely accomplish:

Talk frankly with your direct boss about the reason for leaving:

Because their direct boss is the reason, for many people.
– If you see that your boss is not good at his expertise, tell them.
– Your boss is not good at management, tell them.
– Hating your boss for any reason, tell them
Of course, you tell them in a polite and straightforward way, before leaving.

You can hear the explanation, or not. You do not need to believe the explanation if you feel it is not honest enough. But at least, you say your reasons and your boss knows your reasons.

Many people do not do this, because they are afraid. They fear their boss will:
– Have bad speech about them when they accept new jobs.
– Block their way back to the old company once the new place does not go well.
You make decisions based on fear, you will never be able to walk comfortably and calmly.

Take a look at it, if it is just because of your boss’s speech, the company does not hire you, there are only two possibilities:
– Firstly, it is that company is hasty when they don’t hear your story, Is this a worth company?
– Secondly, your ability is too bad to convince an employer, so is it the fault of your boss?
You are still scared. No problem, you can not do it. It just does not think about anything nice. Nothing peace comes from fear.

And please note, there is an only one person you need to talk frankly about the real reason you left, that’s your direct boss. Colleagues with the department, the high-level boss, the HR department, etc that is the place you should choose to provide suitable information.
If you can’t tell the truth to Boss in front of them, don’t think about what else to do behind their backs. Just taking a quickly leaving.

The second thing to do, after having a straightforward discussion with your direct boss is:

Having a reasonable time to hand over the work to the team

“A Pleasant Quit” of course includes handing over what you have done to the company. Pay special attention to legal issues in the process of handover such as documents, equipment, money… The handover must be made in writing with the signatures of both parties, and you should keep a copy or take a picture of the handover minutes to avoid future problems.

More importantly, make sure you do the best as you can to help your substitutes (of course, if the company has recruited a substitute before you quit), and do not share with them about why you quit.

TO BE CONTINUED…

Cre: Cam nang di la cua Cho Soi

8 SIGNS YOU’VE BEEN IN YOUR JOB TOO LONG

Staying in the same job can be very comfortable – you know everyone, you know how everything works, you don’t have many challenges to deal with – but do you ever get the feeling that something is missing? You could be letting opportunities pass you by and damaging your long term career prospects in the process. It’s important to take control of your career progression.

There’s no simple rule that tells you if you’ve been in your job too long, but any job deserving of your time should be fulfilling and provide you with ongoing opportunities to learn and expand your skill set. Indeed, research conducted by ADP Research Institute in 2015 and 2018 identified that only 16% of workers across the globe are fully engaged with their jobs. So, if you feel your present role is lacking the magic it might have once had, you’re not alone.

If your work no longer inspires you, it could be time to look for something new. Do these eight signs that you’ve been in your job too long sound familiar?

1. You’ve lost your love for the job and the company

Without really thinking about it, you’ve stopped making an effort, and you’re submitting work that you know is not your best. You used to take pride in your work and now you just don’t feel that way about it anymore; it has become routine, boring and unfulfilling.

2. You could do your job in your sleep

Your working life just isn’t supplying you with any challenges anymore, and although this might have felt great at first, you now realise that you miss them and are starting to feel increasingly disengaged. Nothing in your working day is stimulating your intellect and you feel disappointed by the ease with which you can get away with hardly trying.

3. You feel you don’t fit in, you’re less sociable and your colleagues bore you

If office socialising once used to be fun, it isn’t anymore. You can’t be bothered getting to know new people. You keep conversations as short and impersonal as possible and don’t interact with colleagues once the working day is over.

Don’t underestimate the degree to which feeling ‘at one’ with your team can drive overall job wellbeing. The above research by ADP Research Institute in 2015 and 2018 also found that across the world, those working in a team frequently felt much more engaged in their jobs.

4. You’re clock watching and hate Mondays

You arrive promptly at the start of the working day and leave immediately when it ends, keeping careful track of each break in-between and making sure they never get cut short. You count the days until holidays, even if they’re only a couple of days long.

5. You feel left out of meetings and projects

Sometimes you feel as if no-one at work really notices you’re there. You don’t get asked for your opinions and no one treats you as if you have anything to contribute beyond your day to day work. People whom you feel are less qualified than you are often seem to get picked first.

Ernst & Young’s latest Belonging Barometer survey, published in May 2019, interviewed more than 1,000 employed adult Americans and found that people who feel a strong sense of belonging at work are more productive, motivated and engaged. When, however, these respondents were excluded at work, they said they felt ignored, stressed and lonely. Does this describe you?

6. You feel you’re being overlooked for promotion

Younger or less talented people always seem to get chosen before you. You don’t feel that you get a fair degree of praise for the work you do, and you never seem to be singled out for bonuses. It’s years since you were last employee of the month, even though you’re in a small team.

7. You’ve stopped believing in your company

When you first started out you were passionate about what your company did or how it did it, but now you feel this passion is waning. You feel disillusioned and don’t think senior staff care about the company the way you once did. You feel that it has lost its way, is betraying former ideals, or is simply mediocre.

Research has consistently shown that employees are most satisfied working for companies whose values they feel match their own. A Workplace Culture report published by LinkedIn in 2018 stated that 71% of professionals said they would be willing to take a pay cut to work for a company that had shared values and a mission they believed in. So, if don’t feel you can identify with your company’s purpose or work, it might be time to consider a change.

8. You envy former colleagues who have resigned

Perhaps you tell yourself you’re not talented or brave enough to do what they did, but even if they haven’t landed on their feet, you feel they’re better off out of the company you still work for. You keep thinking about the new opportunities open to them that you’re missing out on.

Update your CV

When you’ve been in one job for a long time, you need to explain that you haven’t just been doing one thing. Understandably, you might not have updated your CV for a while, so it’s important to focus on the skills you’ve developed and your achievements in the role since then. Write about projects you worked on and arrange what you write in an order that shows you’ve made progress. If you’ve unsure where to start, consider these quick and easy ways to refresh your CV.

Prepare for interview

There are three things you will need to tackle as quickly and as firmly as possible:

  1. Firstly, you will need to explain in positive terms why you were in one place for so long. You will also need to reassure the interviewer that your skills are up to date.
  2. Then, show that you have what it takes to integrate into a new business culture. If you’ve recently developed new hobbies or done volunteer work, this can help to show that you’re still flexible.
  3. If you’ve stayed in the same role for years, the interviewer may be especially interested to know why you are looking to leave your current job now. You will also need to be ready to talk through your CV with the interviewer, explaining how one stage led to the next, and what makes you a natural choice for the role you’re being interviewed for now.

Contact a recruiter

You could spend all your working hours looking through job adverts on your own, but a skilled recruiter will be able to look at your CV and instantly match you up with suitable positions. After that, it’s up to you. There are no guarantees, but you could be about to find yourself in a job that really makes you feel alive.

Cre: social.hays.com

In-House Recruitment Is Dead. Long Live Outsourced In-House.

I’m a recruiter at heart. So, I fully endorse any and all methods that result in clients attracting, hiring and retaining talent as and when they need.

But the days are numbered for internal recruiters. Companies’ needs are changing, and agency recruitment is having to evolve to match. Leaders are denouncing relics of the past and embracing a method of recruitment that scales with business objectives.

That method is outsourced in-house.And it’s leaving in-house recruitment in the dust.

The Death of Recruitment

The trouble with in-house

In-house recruiters are typically burned-out employees who, frankly, didn’t cut it in the agency world. Barely pitching for one role at a time, these recruiters struggle to compare against the companies that scale the whole market. Their inability to recognise the movers and shakers, or emerging technologies that affect roles, prevents them from being totally effective.

The process of attracting people for a single organisation, where the role is standard (most are) and the organisation is run-of-the-mill, is hardly revolutionary work. That’s why in-house methods are (in the main) mediocre. I mean, sending InMails to people they don’t know on LinkedIn professing to have the best possible new opportunity for them… c’mon.

This is common though! Over the last decade, a wave of companies attempted to build in-house teams. Despite thinking they could cut costs, the market tightened, drying up available talent for key hires and restoring the need for talent acquisition partners.

Why agencies are evolving

Since agencies redefined what recruitment meant, businesses wanted more. Most of the companies I work with now used to be recruitment agencies but have since transformed into talent solutions providers. In-house recruiters simply can’t match their impressive portfolio of products and services. 

The traditional agency model is evolving and diversifying – to cater to businesses with high-volume recruitment plans, for example, and address an ever-widening skills gap. Consequently, key hires know their cost. Exhausted internal recruiters are clueless when it comes to what lures these guys in, leaving businesses with subpar solutions. 

So in came outsourced in-house. This new kid on the block acts as a welcome middle ground, offering businesses an agency recruiter to work on-site (or remotely if preferred) for a few days a week.

Establishing the middle ground

With this method, recruiters tap into the resources, functionality, drivers and management of a recruitment business while being coached daily on how to attract more clients.

Forget holiday pay, or the nightmare of employees taking annual leave in the middle of a project. With hiring costs soaring (and rightly so) too, the need for enterprises to embrace agency innovation in the shape of new solutions and products just makes economic sense. Hiring a journeyman professing to be a superhero recruiter does not (why else would they give up the dream and take a salary, however inflated it might be?). Now it can cost anything from £10k to £20k for one person to be the resourcing agent and place 2-6 people every month!

But it isn’t just money. Businesses that rely on outsourced in-house are “buying the time” of a specialist – including the use of their latest tools, methods and reach. It delivers the desired outcome, whether through a nurtured relationship with a significant talent pool or wealth of services including Statement of Work projects or even employer branding.

This efficient and proven approach is what solidifies the benefits of aligning with a professional and accountable partner. The choice to outsource in-house has never been more compelling.

Cre: Gary Goldsmith